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Why do people get so defensive about the DAW they end up choosing?

User communities is what people are loyal to. Same way people get their back up defending their sports team of choice (or country, or religion, or political affiliation....).
 

3CPU

Member
Nowadays most DAW's are similar, no major leaps in software technology has yet been realized since the past decade or so. But that should change dramatically within the next 10 years.

Being able to take what you hear inside your mind and transfer it with current available technology is a quite a challenge, more or less depending on ones own skill. The future should see Mind Transference become a reality augmented with options to make a few changes. And then with one click transfer to distributor, music supervisors, publicist, media and social networks, this whole process from mind to worldwide availability is so much more efficient.

:geek:
 

dzilizzi

Senior Member
Being able to take what you hear inside your mind and transfer it with current available technology is a quite a challenge, more or less depending on ones own skill. The future should see Mind Transference become a reality augmented with options to make a few changes. And then with one click transfer to distributor, music supervisors, publicist, media and social networks, this whole process from mind to worldwide availability is so much more efficient.

:geek:
I'm still waiting for this! :scout:
 

Trensharo

Active Member
Are many DAW users really that defensive?
Yes.
I think I've seen more threads and comments here from people who consider another DAW than from people who get defensive about the one (or those) they currently use.
Because this is a relatively composer dominant forum and there are more professionals here. People have discussions, so what crowd a forum attracts has a huge impact on the nature and content of discussion threads therein.

If you go to a forum like KVR or Gearspace, things began to look a little less... utopic. Reddit is pretty terrible, as well.

In order to really gauge a DAW community's vibe, you have to participate in its product forums (if exist) and see how open that community is to discussing criticism of the product - including feature requests phrased in a comparative manner (which is also received as criticism).

Pro Tools, Cubase and Ableton tend to have more open (less defensive) communities than DAWs like REAPER, Samplitude or FL Studio (for example). Studio One's community is fairly middle-of-the-road, but veering towards the latter side (and they're almost as evangelical as REAPER users, TBH).

Generally, the more "underdog" a product is, the more it tends to veer towards this defensiveness. The users also tend to be more evangelical about their DAW choices.

We also have to factor in the cultural and socio-economic aspects at play.
 
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3DC

Active Member
Generally, the more "underdog" a product is, the more it tends to veer towards this defensiveness. The users also tend to be more evangelical about their DAW choices.

We also have to factor in the cultural and socio-economic aspects at play.
This pretty much sums up the whole point of this thread. :thumbsup:

I use DAW as my secondary creative tool so I am not that affected by any DAW "brand". I noticed however that the "underdog" DAWs have way less critical bugs and are more stable in music production. This make perfect sense since they usually have less programming functions in the DAW.

I own FL Studio All Plugins Edition and Cubase Pro 11 which I love both. One is filed with very useful functions and the other is streamlined for super fast music production. Guess which one fails me almost daily when I use HOOPUS? No wonder some of this "mature" DAW communities have less defensive attitude. :laugh:

It's the same thing in 3D and 2D world. Maya vs Blender or Photoshop vs Designer. These "wars" are also indicator of ones level of experience. A newbie is more likely prepared to die for the good name of its favourite tool while a senior pro could care less for this total waste of time discussion on which tool is better. :)
 

mauriziodececco

Maurizio, composer and piano player in Paris
There is another very interesting mechanism sometime with software, that i call the Win95 syndrome, or a kind of Stockholm syndrome: sometime, to a get what you want from a piece of software you need to acquire a big set of competences; with old versions of Windows, this required a number of system skills, concerning system recovery, updates, register base, drivers etc, otherwise you get in trouble very quickly. Once people learned these competences, they feel involved with the software, and are a lot less likely to abandon it, because they feel they master it.
Of course, compared to a system that have less problems, or it is easier to use, or more adapted to what you need, this whole set of competences is actually useless, and represents only a cost, not a product advantage.

But once you invested time and effort to acquire them, they look like an added value; and by defending your product, you actually defend your competences and try to make sense of the time/resources you spent to acquire them.

This happens, at different levels, with all kind of software, including DAWS.

Maurizio
 

dcoscina

Senior Member
I have:

Mixbus 32c
Pro Tools
Studio One 5
Cubase 10.5
Reaper 6
Reason 12

I use S1 the majority of the time and use the Rack from Reason. I’m not particularly loyal to any of these DAWs.But a lot of people are and defend their choice with upmost vigour. Why is this?

What do people gain from dissing other peoples choices?

They are just tools at the end of the day.
I work in music retail so I have to be fluent in many of them. And I’ve been at this a loooooong time, starting with Steinberg 12 on the Atari back in 1988.

Presently I’m loving S1 as well because of its macros, clean GUI and general workflow. But I still use LPX and Cubase. I was die hard DP user for years mainly because I worked with folks in LA and they used it. Thought it was great but it did require VEPro for VIs. Same with Pro Tools.

Have to say I’m moving more and more towards Dorico for everything these days and to quote Teddy Riley from his video endorsement of Studio One back in 2010 “I’m looooooving it”. Scoring a friend’s feature next year and using only Dorico- mainly because I get a real orchestra to record with. But the VST handling is really amazing and the synths I will be adding won’t be an issue because Dorico does exceptionally well them.
 
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