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Spitfire Audio “This is London Calling” - BBC Symphony Orchestra

redlester

Active Member
Well am about to leave for two weeks holiday on other side of the world. So at bedtime last night I finally ordered it. Standard hard drive option. 😊
 

Sovereign

Senior Member
So in this context, I'm sure you'll agree that 'how many dynamic layers?' it at least a fair question, no?
Dynamics recorded are equally as important as the articulations, to me at least. I doubt they went in and told the players "just play at whatever dynamic you want, it's all fine". :grin:
 

jamwerks

Senior Member
By the going standards, BBC is essentially 6 libraries (including Solo strings and Harp) in one package, all for 750 euros. Expression-wise 3 or 4 layers would cover about 95% of musical situations. I would be happy with those as long as the scripting is well done (as will surely be the case with SF).

Pretty sure CSB has 5 dynamic layers, and I find even that to be too few for those rare cases where exposed brass parts have lots of timbral moves. For those situations, phase aligned libraries might be (currently) the best solution. In the future, multiple types of recorded crescendi & decrescendi followed by matched sustain releases might be possible too. Anyway, I'm sure that SF will always be pushing the bar to the highest possible.

They've said many times "this is just the beginning". I for one would be interested in future add-ons that could cover those 5% extreme cases, even at a high price.
 

Olfirf

Member
Knowing the number of dynamical layers would certainly help as a decider of how much the BBC library is just a flavor of something we already have or indeed a next step. Having lots of dynamic layers in a library is of course not a warranty it will turn out very well (VSL DS), but it certainly is something great when it is executed very well (CSB). Judging from the size, scope and number of mic positions of this library, the first offering will certainly not be something as detailed, as eight dynamic layers! It would need to have the same size for strings only with less mic positions included to make sense ...
In that aspect, it is probably going to be rather underwhelming. But since they said, it is only the first step, maybe some later products will deliver something truly new ... who knows!
 
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rudi

Active Member
... and I hope we also get a choice of different sleigh bell diameters, weights, AND materials as well... plus at least a hundred hand performances, palm mutes, different tunings, close, ultra-close, hyper-close miking as well as the usual orchestral ones, at least a dozen character mikes too... and that's just for starters! ;)
 

Alex Fraser

Senior Member
... and I hope we also get a choice of different sleigh bell diameters, weights, AND materials as well... plus at least a hundred hand performances, palm mutes, different tunings, close, ultra-close, hyper-close miking as well as the usual orchestral ones, at least a dozen character mikes too... and that's just for starters! ;)
Haha! All jokes aside - what we *will* get is the sound of a sleigh bell recorded close, and from several meters away from a variety of different mic perspectives. Pretty cool. 😎

Also, I can't wait to hear what the orchestra sounds like through the one vintage mono mic.
 

Zedcars

Klaatu barada nikto
I was interested in the possibility of Spitfire recording IRs in Maida Vale because a) it will be flattened in a year or two, and b) it will enable me to record my own sleigh bells and have them sound like Santa is indeed sitting in the same venue as the rest of the orchestra.

Seriously though, it would be amazing if we could blend in other dry libraries seemlessly to this one with a good convo. I did a quick search for Maida Vale IRs but it came up blank.
 

PerryD

Active Member
I have 2 Thunderbolt / usb 3.1 ports on my PC. Both are in use but one is connected to a Thunderbolt drive bay that has two slots that accept HD or SSD. As I understand it, BBCSO comes on an EVO 860 Pro SSD that is built into a Spitfire case. I wonder if it can be removed from the case, so I can use my HD/SSD bay? I understand you can also order on a standard HD but I would rather have a bare SSD if possible.
 

jbuhler

Senior Member
I have 2 Thunderbolt / usb 3.1 ports on my PC. Both are in use but one is connected to a Thunderbolt drive bay that has two slots that accept HD or SSD. As I understand it, BBCSO comes on an EVO 860 Pro SSD that is built into a Spitfire case. I wonder if it can be removed from the case, so I can use my HD/SSD bay? I understand you can also order on a standard HD but I would rather have a bare SSD if possible.
I asked support about this and you can remove the drive (it’s SATA) but you void the warranty for the drive if you do. ETA: Also what @James H said.
 

rudi

Active Member
I was interested in the possibility of Spitfire recording IRs in Maida Vale because a) it will be flattened in a year or two, and b) it will enable me to record my own sleigh bells and have them sound like Santa is indeed sitting in the same venue as the rest of the orchestra.

Seriously though, it would be amazing if we could blend in other dry libraries seemlessly to this one with a good convo. I did a quick search for Maida Vale IRs but it came up blank.
When filling in the Win Everything questionaire from Spitfire Audio, one of the suggestions I made was about having IRs made available, to blend dry libraries in... I didn't win anything ;)
 

VinRice

... i am a robot ...
Standard Orchestral Dynamic markings. PPP PP P MP MF F FF FFF and a couple for extra !

makes sense to me

best

ed
I don't have enough experience working with seasoned players to understand whether this is correct or not but, "as quiet as possible" and "as loud as possible" are really the only constants in this context are they not? In a live piece the ones in between are relative to what else is going on. We have to quantise them in some way for the abstraction of scoring and the further abstraction of mock-ups but these levels of timbre/volume are contingent.

I'm not arguing, I really would like to know.

What I do know is that every library I have has a different concept of what those levels are (I remember somebody doing an excellent comparison illustrating this) which points to how contingent these judgements are. The end result is surely far more dependent on the skill of the sample editors and instrument programmers. I suspect that until the process is automated and AI driven (knowledge of relative spectra and loudness over time, integrated over thousands of players and instruments) 'perfection' will always be elusive. In the meantime we can only judge by the sound itself and whether the instrument is suitable for our needs and desires. The number of recorded timbre/volume layers is probably not a sensible metric for judgement.

Spitfire, and every other company in the space it seems, have determined that controlling the acoustic is more useful and attractive to their customers and a better use of finite corporate resources.

We buy into that or we don't.
 

mistermister

New Member
What I do know is that every library I have has a different concept of what those levels are
An issue is more that dynamics are largely based on player's experience, what everyone else is doing in the section, and context of the music at the time of playing. As you demonstrated with different libraries, one player's mf isn't the same as another's - it's not even necessarily even the same mf they played early depending on what else is going on with the orchestra at the time. Labeling as such is difficult because of this. I find it as more of a rough guide in orchestral libs.

Plus this is part of the fun in writing music (and with samples) in the first place - learning to write for context, with the tools you have. AI-perfect libraries will just likely result in horribly sterile sounding work.
 
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