Some questions about SONUSCORE-THE ORCHESTRA

Geomir

Active Member
For sure Amadeus' focus is not the ensemble patches. It tries to be all in one library offering all the possible instruments, solo and individual sections, plus pianos, choirs, pipe organs, harpsichord, harp, classic guitar, even electric guitar with distortion! Plus the Full Orchestra Ensemble! All this content in 10 GBs... Is it even possible? I leave it to your imagination...

Thank you for mentioning Palette! I had checked it in the past and forgot about it! I agree with you that the demos are not so convincing... Maybe they should send it to Cory Pelizzari for a review walkthrough / demo! :)

Still it sounds OK (it's not that bad), and I like the interface and the fact that it's compatible with the Free Kontakt Player! Btw it costs exactly as much as Iconica Ensembles! Many options, many choices, many hours of research, but that's a good thing, isn't it? :)
 
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vitocorleone123

Active Member
So did you make the final step to buy your first full orchestral library? Or are you still planning? I know first hand that it's a hard decision, especially if you are not a pro musician (or have a low budget anyway), because your final choice will be your main tool for your next several projects (whatever they are)! :)

For me in the end it was EWHO Gold, both the sound quality and content for the price is just unbeatable!

But even if the quality of the sound and the number of articulations of EWHO beat even more expensive (and newer) libraries, still it could not be your best choice, because, unlike some other libraries you may be "watching" and are interested-in, it does not contain harps, piano, choirs, etc... I happen to own some dedicated harp libraries and a nice dedicated choir library, plus some decent grand piano virtual instruments, so EWHO was a perfect buy for me, actually I was happy it lacks this "extra instruments", because I know that all the money (and all the GBs in my SSD drive!) I spent was exactly what I needed!

Already AndyP's replies were really helpful here, because he owns these products and he is having first-hand experience with them!
I did choose - Audio Imperia Nucleus (pre-order for $350). I opted for ease of use plus quality instead of articulations plus quality (eg Hollywood). The main reason for that choice is lack of knowledge and experience around orchestration. I'm a beginner, and am unlikely to create anything complex with it any time in the next year(s); I'm more likely to create something more hybrid style as electronic music is more my thing. But I want to explore and learn.

The Orchestra was going to be my choice ... Until Nucleus happened. The pre-order bargain pulled me over, which I'm sure was the point. $300 was my limit but I pushed it. And am glad I did. Nucleus sounds fantastic. At full price ($450) I'd have chosen The Orchestra instead and likely also been satisfied.
 
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TigerTheFrog

Stay Safe!
Palette of redroom audio is an ensemble library that has been mentioned here from time to time. It is quite complete, but has no legato or solo instruments. The Specs and the Demos didn't convince me so much, but maybe it meets your taste.
Palette is a collection of four libraries, and the second one, "Melodics," has several solo instruments, including a violin, cello, flute, oboe, trumpet and a horn, plus "combos" of things like violin octaves, celli and double basses, oboe and bassoon octaves, bass clarinet and contrabassoon octaves, etc.

Unlike libraries with "room" in them like Orchestral Tools, the Cinema Studio series or Spitfire libraries recorded in Air Studios, the Palette libraries are super dry. They may be good libraries for combining with other libraries, but less good, in my opinion, for people who are looking for something that sounds beautiful out of the box. You need to add effects, and they come with no presets.
 

AndyP

Senior Member
Palette is a collection of four libraries, and the second one, "Melodics," has several solo instruments, including a violin, cello, flute, oboe, trumpet and a horn, plus "combos" of things like violin octaves, celli and double basses, oboe and bassoon octaves, bass clarinet and contrabassoon octaves, etc.
Sorry, I should have mentioned that! My answer was mainly about the Symphonic Sketchpad version. Since there are no legato instruments there, the Melodics extension is actually a good part.

But the legatos in the Melodic version didn't convince me of that. To be honest, I hardly notice it, if at all. At least not with the strings. And in the walktrough they elegantly skipped the legatos. And when a legato patch was played it was all, but no legato.

And also in the melodics the strings are combined in high octaves and low.

That was my main reason not to keep me busy with palette. Had that not been the case, I might have bought the ensembles and melodics, so I found them too expensive as a combination with the limitations. My criticism of the legato sound was based on this, because there is nothing wrong with the basic sound.

It's a pity because they offer everything you need as a basic library.
There are some good features in the other extensions, like the midi export for runs per drag and drop.
 

Geomir

Active Member
I did choose - Audio Imperia Nucleus (pre-order for $350). I opted for ease of use plus quality instead of articulations plus quality (eg Hollywood). The main reason for that choice is lack of knowledge and experience around orchestration. I'm a beginner, and am unlikely to create anything complex with it any time in the next year(s); I'm more likely to create something more hybrid style as electronic music is more my thing. But I want to explore and learn.

The Orchestra was going to be my choice ... Until Nucleus happened. The pre-order bargain pulled me over, which I'm sure was the point. $300 was my limit but I pushed it. And am glad I did. Nucleus sounds fantastic. At full price ($450) I'd have chosen The Orchestra instead and likely also been satisfied.
I am not telling you this to make you feel more happy with your choice, but you did an EXCELLENT choice! The one I would also have made in your position! Compared with The Orchestra, Nucleus offers more content, high sound quality (at least from all the demos I have ever heard - but you can already confirm that!), the solo instruments are so useful, it's a very polished product with modern beautiful interface, and very easy to use!

I mean, you can go for a few (or many!) years with it, and never REALLY need something more! It covers all the basics, including a choir that sounds much better than TO's choir (at least in the demos)! I think this product appeared exactly at the right time in front of you! :)

Have fun with it! :)
 
I did choose - Audio Imperia Nucleus (pre-order for $350). I opted for ease of use plus quality instead of articulations plus quality (eg Hollywood). The main reason for that choice is lack of knowledge and experience around orchestration. I'm a beginner, and am unlikely to create anything complex with it any time in the next year(s); I'm more likely to create something more hybrid style as electronic music is more my thing. But I want to explore and learn.

The Orchestra was going to be my choice ... Until Nucleus happened. The pre-order bargain pulled me over, which I'm sure was the point. $300 was my limit but I pushed it. And am glad I did. Nucleus sounds fantastic. At full price ($450) I'd have chosen The Orchestra instead and likely also been satisfied.
@Geomir and @vitocorleone123 - I'm curious as I'm also "about" to choose my first orchestral library (I have Albion V but I don't count it as a full orchestra), did you primarily consider your choices based on a price ceiling, albeit making certain the sound quality was high? While I'm going a bit insane waiting, I think BBCSO is going to be my choice, but I'm interested to hear more about your decision process. I realize BBCSO is more expensive than either Nucleus or EWHO Gold, but price isn't always indicative of a better product.
 

sostenuto

Big NKS Fan !
I have to listen to Ivory II again, I already had that on my list and then bought something else.
I'm thrilled with the Steinway D-274 which came with the Synchron update. Just for that the update price was a joke.
With D-274, it will be hard to improve ! Synchron Update was the closest yet to getting me on VSL train. Did go for Smart Orchestra and Smart Spheres _ to get acquainted with Synchron Player. ;)

Will watch for future offers involving D-274.
 
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AndyP

Senior Member
With D-274, it will be hard to improve ! Synchron Update was the closest yet to getting me on VSL train. :rolleyes: Will watch for future offers involving D-274.
I think I made the update to synchron-ized mainly because of that.
It's "only" the light version, but it already tops many other full versions from other vendors.

However, I find it difficult to use for very soft, easy, rather dampened tones. So far I haven't found the "perfect" piano for this purpose.

For everything else, the Steinway is my favorite.
 

vitocorleone123

Active Member
@Geomir and @vitocorleone123 - I'm curious as I'm also "about" to choose my first orchestral library (I have Albion V but I don't count it as a full orchestra), did you primarily consider your choices based on a price ceiling, albeit making certain the sound quality was high? While I'm going a bit insane waiting, I think BBCSO is going to be my choice, but I'm interested to hear more about your decision process. I realize BBCSO is more expensive than either Nucleus or EWHO Gold, but price isn't always indicative of a better product.
Whew. Good question. Price was, of course, a primary factor. My (lack of) skill level was the second one for me - a lot of articulations sounds great, but would be overload/overkill at this point for me. Flexibility/completeness was another - I wanted ensemble, section and solos. I ready had some individual libraries, like Apocalypse Elements, Fluid Shorts and Caspian because I knew I'd combine them with a full orchestra package. But not that many other libraries. Finally, sound quality mattered - sure, Nucleus is 24bit, but Hollywood sounds great and it's "only" 16 bit. In other words, recording quality more than bit depth etc.

I'd loved to have gotten BBC but it was both too expensive AND offers way more functionalality (articulations) than I'd know what to do with anytime soon. Or possibly ever.

Hope that helps! Im confident that if someone takes the time to consider what matters for them , what they can use, and how long they can get good use of the tool before outgrowing it or getting bored, then you'll be satisfied with your purchase. At least until the wallet starts to get that itch again!
 

Geomir

Active Member
@Geomir and @vitocorleone123 - I'm curious as I'm also "about" to choose my first orchestral library (I have Albion V but I don't count it as a full orchestra), did you primarily consider your choices based on a price ceiling, albeit making certain the sound quality was high? While I'm going a bit insane waiting, I think BBCSO is going to be my choice, but I'm interested to hear more about your decision process. I realize BBCSO is more expensive than either Nucleus or EWHO Gold, but price isn't always indicative of a better product.
For me also price is very important, as my budget is relatively low.

From all the products discussed here, I suppose that Nucleus Core is a very nice choice for a "first orchestral library", because it offers all the basics (and more), including solo instruments and choirs, it has a nice modern easy-to-use interface, and it sounds good!

EWHO Gold is for sure the biggest library, a huge pure orchestral library that has all the possible instruments / articulations you're gonna ever need. It offers brass solo and sections, woodwinds solo and sections, and strings sections, but no solo strings and no choir. Also no Full Mixed Orchestra Ensmbles. The sound of the instruments is very good, relatively dry (which can be very good if you are willing to apply your own reverb!) and the price (during EastWest common sales every other month) is a steal! If you take this path, in the future you can buy a choir library (if you ever need it) and a solo strings library! And have dedicated separate full products for everything you want to do, which will give you the best possible quality, at least better than most "compact-all-in-one" libraries!

I mean, i.e. a 20GB choir library offers many more options (and better sound quality) than a choir instrument that content-wise is the one tenth (1/10) of a 20 GB all-in-one library. Same for solo strings. But it's up to you if you are going to really need many choir options or the extra solo strings in your music! If not, then the solo violin, solo cello and the choir section of Nucleus Core I suppose that can cover most of your needs!

The other product discussed here is The Orchestra (Complete) by Sonuscore. Usually it sells for $400, and it offers many Full / Mixed Orchestra ensembles, and also individual sections of strings, woodwinds and brass, plus harp and choir. From everything I have read (forum users and reviews) and heard (demos) it sounds just OK, but I think the price you pay for the sound quality you get is a little high, especially if you are NOT interested to use the orchestral rhythms it includes (these ready-to-use rhythms is the big selling point of this library).

Of course all of the above libraries contain percussion instruments as well, and needless to say EWHO Gold has by far the biggest collection, including every possible pitched and unpitched orchestral percussion instrument. The other 2 offer the basics, which again could cover most of your needs.

And last but not least, BBC Orchestra! OK, I just cannot imagine how this could be a bad choice for... anyone! If you can wait, if you can afford it, and if you have a powerful system with plenty of free GBs, I suppose that this could be an excellent buy! We are talking about the biggest product in the history of Spitfire! And you save $250 if you pre-order it!
 
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AndyP

Senior Member
Of course all of the above libraries contain percussion instruments as well, and needless to say EWHO Gold has by far the biggest collection, including every possible pitched and unpitched orchestral percussion instrument. The other 2 offer the basics, which again could cover most of your needs.
Maybe this is interesting for you and for the price it may be what you are looking for. For the price it is a very good offer.

Legato instruments are not included, but you have them in EWHO.

67% off Palette Symphonic Sketchpad - limited time only
 
Thanks @vitocorleone123, @Geomir and @AndyP. I have been recommended EWHO and BBCSO multiple times, and I'm surprised that many state that EWHO is a "dry" library as I always thought of EW as the company making the biggest, epic, cinematic libraries, which I thought would mean "wet". My orchestral composition interest is primarily classical and some film scoring - but not epic. I prefer chamber-size works, where the emphasis is on woodwinds and brass. My first consideration was SA's SCS and SSB with OT's WWs. That said, if a library includes small ensembles and solo instruments I'm hoping I can get a similar "chamber" sound with all the added benefits of the full symphonic libraries. What is really pushing me toward BBCSO is the learning aspects - including the template and videos SA have already shared, plus future-promised midi files which would help me grow quickly in terms of midi manipulation, and learning about mixing/compression/reverbs/etc. It seems the sound quality of these various libraries (EW, TO, SA) is/will be roughly the same level of quality - albeit with different "sounds", timbre, rooms, etc. While I want a relatively "drier" library for future layering, the reality is that I need to focus on composing, orchestrating, learning to use various articulations, mixing and production learning. I'm hopeful BBCSO will be dry enough for this, while giving me all the added benefits of learning that they're promising.
 

Geomir

Active Member
Maybe this is interesting for you and for the price it may be what you are looking for. For the price it is a very good offer.

Legato instruments are not included, but you have them in EWHO.

67% off Palette Symphonic Sketchpad - limited time only
Holy mother of Jesus this is an insane crazy deal, maybe they hired some EW employees to do the job! :)

What a coincidence, we have been discussing about Palette just yesterday! Thank you very much for this, I was browsing the site of Red Room Audio's Palette yesterday night and the deal was not active, it must have been enabled exactly after I left the website!

Yes this will probably be my next instant buy! The price (and the total value-for-money) is too great to be ignored!!
 

Geomir

Active Member
Thanks @vitocorleone123, @Geomir and @AndyP. I have been recommended EWHO and BBCSO multiple times, and I'm surprised that many state that EWHO is a "dry" library as I always thought of EW as the company making the biggest, epic, cinematic libraries, which I thought would mean "wet". My orchestral composition interest is primarily classical and some film scoring - but not epic. I prefer chamber-size works, where the emphasis is on woodwinds and brass. My first consideration was SA's SCS and SSB with OT's WWs. That said, if a library includes small ensembles and solo instruments I'm hoping I can get a similar "chamber" sound with all the added benefits of the full symphonic libraries. What is really pushing me toward BBCSO is the learning aspects - including the template and videos SA have already shared, plus future-promised midi files which would help me grow quickly in terms of midi manipulation, and learning about mixing/compression/reverbs/etc. It seems the sound quality of these various libraries (EW, TO, SA) is/will be roughly the same level of quality - albeit with different "sounds", timbre, rooms, etc. While I want a relatively "drier" library for future layering, the reality is that I need to focus on composing, orchestrating, learning to use various articulations, mixing and production learning. I'm hopeful BBCSO will be dry enough for this, while giving me all the added benefits of learning that they're promising.
It's true that the previous flagship product of EastWest, the most awarded music library in history, EastWest Quantum Leap Symphonic Orchestra, was recorded in a concert hall, so it has a natural reverb. It is an older library, does not feature true legato, but everyone that is still using it says that it sounds very nice! Its price during common EastWest sales is - as you can safely guess - a steal!

But really now, I simply cannot imagine anyone being disappointed for buying BBC Orchestra! It's just too great to be a wrong choice! This is the biggest product of Spitfire ever! Even the price right now is fantastic for what it offers! If you can wait of course... :)

Also there are other libraries / options for you if you want to focus in small sections / chamber strings / first chair players / etc. Maybe you want to search this forum about that? You will have more options and choices, closer to what exactly your are looking for.
 

Willowtree

I make music
Thanks @vitocorleone123, @Geomir and @AndyP. I have been recommended EWHO and BBCSO multiple times, and I'm surprised that many state that EWHO is a "dry" library as I always thought of EW as the company making the biggest, epic, cinematic libraries, which I thought would mean "wet". My orchestral composition interest is primarily classical and some film scoring - but not epic. I prefer chamber-size works, where the emphasis is on woodwinds and brass. My first consideration was SA's SCS and SSB with OT's WWs. That said, if a library includes small ensembles and solo instruments I'm hoping I can get a similar "chamber" sound with all the added benefits of the full symphonic libraries. What is really pushing me toward BBCSO is the learning aspects - including the template and videos SA have already shared, plus future-promised midi files which would help me grow quickly in terms of midi manipulation, and learning about mixing/compression/reverbs/etc. It seems the sound quality of these various libraries (EW, TO, SA) is/will be roughly the same level of quality - albeit with different "sounds", timbre, rooms, etc. While I want a relatively "drier" library for future layering, the reality is that I need to focus on composing, orchestrating, learning to use various articulations, mixing and production learning. I'm hopeful BBCSO will be dry enough for this, while giving me all the added benefits of learning that they're promising.
I've never used Spitfire products, but admittedly BBCSO is having me tempted. Still, I have thousands dollars worth of libraries I've purchased but never really dug into, or never found use for. What's the point of having 10 Brass libraries if you only use 3?

In other words, my advice is to not do what I do and bulk on libraries "just in case". Purchase what you need when you need. IE if you don't need a Solo Flugelhorn now, don't get one until your project demands it.

My piece of advice? Subscribe to Composer Cloud for a month, spend it giving EWHO a try. If you find EWHO is all you need, purchase it on the next sale. Otherwise, check out user demos of BBCSO once it releases the end of next month and see if that's more suited for you.

Keep in mind, something can sound good but have a workflow you don't enjoy. You seem to have a good idea of this since you seem to have done your research, but I've sometimes purchased products because I like the sound, only to realise the way the libraries are programmed is very different from how I prefer to work.

For example, I love the sound of Caspian Brass, yet almost always reach for my other brass libraries simply because I prefer how they're programmed. That's not because Caspian Brass doesn't have excellent programming, but because it's designed for a very different workflow than I'm used to.

The amount of gigs of content or number of samples or programming or quality of sound won't matter if you find you can't work with the product.

Just some thoughts, but you seem to be doing your research and have a much more common sense in regards to this than I. :)

EDIT: Typo/strange wording
 
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I've never used Spitfire products, but admittedly BBCSO is having me tempted. Still, I have thousands dollars worth of libraries I've purchased but never really dug into, or never found use for. What's the point of having 10 Brass libraries if you only use 3?

In other words, my advice is to not do what I do and bulk on libraries "just in case". Purchase what you need when you need. IE if you don't need a Solo Flugelhorn now, don't get one until your project demands it.

My piece of advice? Subscribe to Composer Cloud for a month, spend it giving EWHO a try. If you find EWHO is all you need, purchase it on the next sale. Otherwise, check out user demos of BBCSO once it releases the end of next month and see if that's more suited for you.

Keep in mind, something can sound good but have a workflow you don't enjoy. You seem to have a good idea of this since you seem to have done your research, but I've sometimes purchased products because I like the sound, only to realise the way the libraries are programmed is very different from how I prefer to work.

For example, I love the sound of Caspian Brass, yet almost always reach for my other brass libraries simply because I prefer how they're programmed. That's not because Caspian Brass doesn't have excellent programming, but because it's designed for a very different workflow than I'm used to.

The amount of gigs of content or number of samples or programming or quality of sound won't matter if you find you can't work with the product.

Just some thoughts, but you seem to be doing your research and have a much more common sense in regards to this than I. :)

EDIT: Typo/strange wording
Thank you @Willowtree, very helpful. With regards to buying superfluous libraries, this is advice I've seen often and so far have been able to stick to (I only have the Komplete 12 set which came with my KK S88, Albion V, Sound Dust I and Noire). At this point I'm looking to get a bread and butter orchestral library which I plan to take at least a year to explore without buying other products (fingers crossed, wallet thrown away). This is the second recommendation to trial Composer Cloud I've received, and I think that's what I'll do. That said, to my untrained eye, BBCSO and EWHO seem to be very similar orchestras in terms of being a bread and butter library. BBCSO has harp and a few other instruments (and a billion more mics which I doubt I need), whereas EWHO seems to have more articulations. Beyond workflow, which is a great call out (thank you), what about tonality? I already know I can work with Spitfire's products for workflow as I am mainly using Albion V and Sound Dust I. In fact, being new to midi orchestration, primarily using SA products is probably shaping my workflow more than the other way around. But in terms of tonality, and since I don't/won't have both products in hand for comparison, does it make sense to listen to the demos and determine whether I prefer one vs. the other? Meaning, even if I find EWHO has a workflow that works for me, would it not be prudent before buying a library to determine if I prefer the overall tonality of another library? Or is this a matter of reverbs, EQ's, etc. which I can change at will? I honestly don't know how much the tonality differs from library to library, I just know that a ton of threads in this forum discuss tonality, attacks, articulations, dynamic layers, etc. which no two libraries seem to be truly comparable. When I go to listen to library demos, some have only a few in even fewer composition styles, while others have so many I honestly lose confidence that I could replicate any of their tonality. I also always keep in mind that the demos are likely the very best sounding those libraries can be, given they're created by experts. I guess a simpler way to ask would be, is workflow paramount to tonality, or should tonality be considered on an equal basis and if so, what's the best way to test this?
 

AndyP

Senior Member
I guess a simpler way to ask would be, is workflow paramount to tonality, or should tonality be considered on an equal basis and if so, what's the best way to test this?
In my opinion, tonality is the most important thing besides playability.
Workflow is also important, but it doesn't help much if the first two criteria are not right.

Tonality can be heard in reviews, the playability only at the providers who offer limited demos.
That was a big plus for the Iconica ensembles, but I didn't buy them because I could try them out.

EWHO is not the most intuitive library, but it is full of surprises regarding the many variations of articulations. Sometimes it's small details that make the difference. I'm sure I still haven't discovered all the tricks and hidden subtleties.

But you also notice the age of EWHO. The sound in the lower registers is not as brilliant as in the newer librarys. But it fulfills its purpose, especially the playability suits me very well and it has a sound character that I like.

Composercloud for testing is optimal, other manufacturers should also offer that!
 

TigerTheFrog

Stay Safe!
Thank you @Willowtree, very helpful. With regards to buying superfluous libraries, this is advice I've seen often and so far have been able to stick to (I only have the Komplete 12 set which came with my KK S88, Albion V, Sound Dust I and Noire). At this point I'm looking to get a bread and butter orchestral library which I plan to take at least a year to explore without buying other products (fingers crossed, wallet thrown away). This is the second recommendation to trial Composer Cloud I've received, and I think that's what I'll do. That said, to my untrained eye, BBCSO and EWHO seem to be very similar orchestras in terms of being a bread and butter library. BBCSO has harp and a few other instruments (and a billion more mics which I doubt I need), whereas EWHO seems to have more articulations. Beyond workflow, which is a great call out (thank you), what about tonality? I already know I can work with Spitfire's products for workflow as I am mainly using Albion V and Sound Dust I. In fact, being new to midi orchestration, primarily using SA products is probably shaping my workflow more than the other way around. But in terms of tonality, and since I don't/won't have both products in hand for comparison, does it make sense to listen to the demos and determine whether I prefer one vs. the other? Meaning, even if I find EWHO has a workflow that works for me, would it not be prudent before buying a library to determine if I prefer the overall tonality of another library? Or is this a matter of reverbs, EQ's, etc. which I can change at will? I honestly don't know how much the tonality differs from library to library, I just know that a ton of threads in this forum discuss tonality, attacks, articulations, dynamic layers, etc. which no two libraries seem to be truly comparable. When I go to listen to library demos, some have only a few in even fewer composition styles, while others have so many I honestly lose confidence that I could replicate any of their tonality. I also always keep in mind that the demos are likely the very best sounding those libraries can be, given they're created by experts. I guess a simpler way to ask would be, is workflow paramount to tonality, or should tonality be considered on an equal basis and if so, what's the best way to test this?
I haven't really paid much attention to BGSCSO because I know I won't buy it, so take this with a grain of salt.

It's new. Other libraries, including previous Spitfire libraries, have a history. They've been used thousands of times and there are many satisfied customers who can show the results. You could spend a year looking at the results in YouTube.

Personally I would say go with the Cinematic Studio series. Most people will agree that it is the best string library for the price. Many people who have much more expensive libraries prefer the legato in CSS.

Just as important for you, it has a super easy user interface. There's nothing more ideal for somebody just starting out.

You can make a lot of music with strings and brass and the woodwinds are expected later this year. You can get your percussion elsewhere.

If you seriously get into this I believe that no matter what you buy now you will buy CSS later, so I think it's the best play now.

Just my two cents, as I am also a beginner, have followed this path and have been very happy.
 

sostenuto

Big NKS Fan !
Interesting to see RRA /APD promo today ....... Palette - Symphonic Sketchpad @ $99. :eek: Having used Primary Colors a bit, this jumbles near-term choices. Trying to keep large set of pro & cons straight when comparing libs mentioned above /earlier , but cost ~ value equation changes notably for RRA .... :barefoot:
 

AndyP

Senior Member
Interesting to see RRA /APD promo today ....... Palette - Symphonic Sketchpad @ $99. :eek: Having used Primary Colors a bit, this jumbles near-term choices. Trying to keep large set of pro & cons straight when comparing libs mentioned above /earlier , but cost ~ value equation changes notably for RRA .... :barefoot:
I got the sketchpad today. I have to say it's a fine package.
Not without the one or the other little thing that could be improved, but especially for the price it is a gift.
So I'm making a clear buy recommendation here!