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Not music, but amazing nightingale song

fiestared

Vintage -but- not obsolete
this season, nightingale nests only 10 meters from my recording studio
recorded him these nights

chain: mic pair AKG414 -> Drawmer 1969 -> EQ EAR825 -> Manley Vary mu

AMAZING ! Fantastic recording quality ! Thanks a million for posting, I am crazy about birds, I spend lots of time watching them, especially the king of Earth the "common swift" not a singer but a little guy who stay in the sky at least ten months (some could stay in the sky 2 years) without landing, yes ten months ! and fly 200 000 km a year... :faint:
 
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dedindi

dedindi

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AMAZING ! Fantastic recording quality ! Thanks a million for posting, I am crazy about birds, I spend lots of time watching them, especially the king of Earth the "common swift" not a singer but a little guy who stay in the sky at least ten months (some could stay in the sky 2 years) without landing, yes ten months ! and fly 200 000 km a year... :faint:

I live in the woodland, so I have about 100 species in spring and summer. love this music.
I know abt common swift - they have an amazing life. all the time on the wing.

here is the nightingale melody, it has a structure similar to human songs:

nightingale%20song%20score.jpg
 

Rob

stale member
this reminds me of a poem by Harold Monro, "The Nightingale near the House"...

Here is the soundless cypress on the lawn:
It listens, listens. Taller trees beyond
Listen. The moon at the unruffled pond
Stares. And you sing, you sing.

That star-enchanted song falls through the air
From lawn to lawn down terraces of sound,
Darts in white arrows on the shadowed ground;
And all the night you sing.

My dreams are flowers to which you are a bee
As all night long I listen, and my brain
Receives your song, then loses it again
In moonlight on the lawn.

Now is your voice a marble high and white,
Then like a mist on fields of paradise,
Now is a raging fire, then is like ice,
Then breaks, and it is dawn.

Harold Monro
 

Rob

stale member
great poem, never read it before, thank you!
I so much loved this poem that I wrote a piece for contralto and wind ensemble on it, which alas was never performed... the reason was that in my young composer’s naivité I wrote the score in concert. The conductor refused the score asking me to re-write it transposed and I was offended by his reply and sent him to hell :)
 
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dedindi

dedindi

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I so much loved this poem that I wrote a piece for contralto and wind ensemble on it, which alas was never performed... the reason was that in my young composer’s naivité I wrote the score in concert. The conductor refused the score asking me to re-write it transposed and I was offended by his reply and sent him to hell :)
wow!!!
do you still have the score?

btw, i can share this record in 24/48 if someone needs it
 
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dedindi

dedindi

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i was going to record bees for a long time
it was not an easy task
now i don’t think that bees are such hard workers as it described in fairy tales
a plum bush blossomed near the studio
i waited for bees one week connecting daily 100m of cables
but they appeared only once and buzzed just two hours
the wind hindered recordings
so there is only 10 minutes but it is excellent
this record is quieter than my other soundscapes
but I did not raise the volume to an unnatural level
bees are very quiet creatures

 

fiestared

Vintage -but- not obsolete
i was going to record bees for a long time
it was not an easy task
now i don’t think that bees are such hard workers as it described in fairy tales
a plum bush blossomed near the studio
i waited for bees one week connecting daily 100m of cables
but they appeared only once and buzzed just two hours
the wind hindered recordings
so there is only 10 minutes but it is excellent
this record is quieter than my other soundscapes
but I did not raise the volume to an unnatural level
bees are very quiet creatures

Good work, again, thanks. They probably are all syndicated... Joke appart, here we have a lot less bees than before, and one thing, most of them are not in a hive, they're solitary bees...poor babies...
 

Vonk

Active Member
I love the clear recording by the OP. Excellent.
There is an orchestrated part for a nightingale in Rhespghi's "Pines of Rome". It's six minutes in to this recording.
 
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Stringtree

Senior Member
I'm glad I caught this. Very enjoyable.

Hilarious signal chain for the little primadonna. I'm surprised she didn't demand the U47.

Here's one of my favorites, and I haven't heard the wood thrush this year yet:



To my knowledge, we don't have your nightingale here in Northern US, but I could listen to the wood thrush for hours. I do, when it's back from wandering.

Nice post!

Greg
 
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dedindi

dedindi

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Good work, again, thanks. They probably are all syndicated... Joke appart, here we have a lot less bees than before, and one thing, most of them are not in a hive, they're solitary bees...poor babies...
i thought that if the bees do not live in the hive, then they are wild and live in hollows
in any case, i did not know that they could live in isolation from the family
 
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dedindi

dedindi

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I love the clear recording by the OP. Excellent.
There is an orchestrated part for a nightingale in Rhespghi's "Pines of Rome". It's six minutes in to this recording.

i'm a big fan of Ottorino Respighi, surprisingly nice music for the time when modernism captured many composers =)
i especially like his Fontane di Roma

in this video, the nightingale sings through a long delay processor =)
 
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dedindi

dedindi

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I'm glad I caught this. Very enjoyable.

Hilarious signal chain for the little primadonna. I'm surprised she didn't demand the U47.

Here's one of my favorites, and I haven't heard the wood thrush this year yet:

To my knowledge, we don't have your nightingale here in Northern US, but I could listen to the wood thrush for hours. I do, when it's back from wandering.

Nice post!

Greg

this is male
they usually sing while grooming and when the female hatches eggs
when children appear, they stop singing for fear of not waking children, as i understand it =)

of course, he asked for this legendary Neumann, but i don’t have a stereo pair =)

blackbirds are great!
they are not as technical as nightingales, but they constantly vary their repertoire imitating other birds
every week they have a new remix!

Serg
 
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