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Cubase 12 Your Expectations

kitekrazy

Senior Member
I'm going to assume Yamaha is ditching eLicenser. VSL is going iLok and Steinberg will do their owntype of authorization. Cubase 12 will be allowed on two machines.
 
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Joseph JP

Joseph JP

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I just filmed a video on what I think the problems with Expression Maps are and so to answer the OPs question properly, this is what I would love to be included/changed in Cubase 12.

I hope Steinberg watches your videos and phones you up, you have summarised all the issues we face. Thank you for doing that. They have a lot of time now in their hands for cubase 12, they should just transfer your brain to their department.:grin: IT will definitely make cubase 12 a pleasure to use with the Luke Johnson additional features and the UI can take inspiration from your room. It looks like a luxury spaceship with extra comfort and ease of use. Definitely needed in cubase 12.
 
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Joseph JP

Joseph JP

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I just purchased Nuendo 11 but haven’t registered it. Will the grace period to Nuendo 12 free upgrade apply to Nuendo users or just Cubase ?
Most probably just Nuendo. Cause you bought a Nuendo licence and not a Cubase one. Also the grace period is for cubase users and does not mention nuendo. So you can only upgrade cubase and not Nuendo. Maybe the upgrade to Nuendo 12 starts in the second half of 2022 after Cubase 12 is released. We have no information on when Nuendo 12 will be released.
 
As a long time Cubase user (around 20 years, having skipped only one upgrade), I can attest to the fact that the Cubase UI is being gradually modernized, one release at a time. So what you're seeing in the current Cubase UI are quite a few inconsistencies due to this evolution from the ancient to the new.

So I think you're at least partly preaching to the already converted.

But UI isn't the only priority - there has been a rather strong feature evolution and audio engine evolution as well. Of course, never quite fast enough for many of us, but I haven't really seen any other DAW beat the overall functional depth and width of Cubase yet, while several other DAWs have specific strengths suited better for specific workflows and use cases.


Having only skipped one paid upgrade (SX2) over the last 20 years, in my mental model, Cubase is on a voluntary subscription model via the annual paid upgrade cycle. -- And I like that a whole lot better than losing access if not paying.
I think the problem with this payment model is no one wants to pay for an upgrade IF all it is is bug fixes and UI/UX updates. Or rather that doesn't attract enough new users. It's not profitable enough. So they feel forced to add more half baked features that take years to fix afterwards. They feel forced to package marketable features to attract more upgrades and users. I say this because it happened at my previous company and happens to others.

The subscription model skips this. They can skip trying to come up with a new marketable feature and instead they're paid to fix what they already have.
 
Yeah your point is well taken, but there's like a gazillion more features now.
Oh absolutely. Cubase has to struggle with a gazillion features, which we can respect. Their UI also shows what looks like the remnants of a series of lost battles, past and present.

I say this as a an old man yelling at a cloud (and sure maybe I'm not that old) but we all went astray when we abandoned the constraints of early OS chrome GUIs. Companies really wanted to figure out how to make UIs look "cool" but that clearly got complicated.

I just saw a friend using Pro Tools 7. I was amazed at the clarity of the application during that time. Felt like a golden age.
 

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Trensharo

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Oh absolutely. Cubase has to struggle with a gazillion features, which we can respect. Their UI also shows what looks like the remnants of a series of lost battles, past and present.

I say this as a an old man yelling at a cloud (and sure maybe I'm not that old) but we all went astray when we abandoned the constraints of early OS chrome GUIs. Companies really wanted to figure out how to make UIs look "cool" but that clearly got complicated.

I just saw a friend using Pro Tools 7. I was amazed at the clarity of the application during that time. Felt like a golden age.
Pro Tools is actually a HORRIBLE example, because the software has actually changed very little in its overall UI/UX over the years. The latest version looks practically the same as PT7 - just with concessions made to accommodate new functionality that needs UI-level changes (i.e. Folder Tracks).

If I saw someone using PT7, I'd assume they were using a far more recent revision of the software - at a glance.

That Pro Tools screenshot doesn't look much different from the current version, and neither does that Cubase UI. The only obvious difference is the color scheme, though I don't find the current Cubase color scheme to be even approaching bad (but I am getting tired of every developer thinking they have to "go dark" by default.

Old version of most apps can be made to seem like "clarity" when all the utility windows etc. are closed. The worse UIs in the world can look palatable if you present the right screen capture to someone.
 

pixel

Senior Member
A Gui update….this is Cubase from 20 years ago….



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Hideous. In comparison, Sonar was eye candy at that time (now it's incredibly cluttered IMO). Yet I switched to SX 1, probably because I had a cheap LCD monitor on which there was not so much difference :D
Now I don't remember if there was a huge difference between those two at that time (and what was the reason to quit Sonar).
 
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